Aim Your Golf Swing Visually

You have no doubt heard of aiming your golf swing by sighting from your target backwards to the ball and aligning yourself using that imaginary line.  But you can still go wrong with that method.  You need a way to check it before you start your swing.

When you are in your stance and ready to start the club back, you might well take one more look at the target.  Use that glance to check your aim.

Looking downrange you will see a picture that contains your target.  Where that target lies in the picture tells you where you have aimed yourself.

The two pictures below show what I mean.  The first picture shows you what you would see if you stood facing the flagstick and looked straight at it.

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The second picture shows you what you see when you are in your stance and turn your head.  The flagstick is considerably to the left of where you saw it when looking straight on.

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When you practice your aim at the driving range, get into a setup you know is properly aimed and pay special attention to where the flagstick lies in the picture you see when you turn your head.  That image is what you want to remember.  It won’t take more than a few practice sessions to learn it.

To help you fix that location, notice when you turn your head and look to the left, you will see an out-of-focus image of the bridge of your nose framing the picture on its left edge.  The flagstick will be somewhere near that image, the exact location depending on how flexible your neck is.  

(Unfortunately, I’m not good enough at altering images to include this frame on the photograph, but if you look to the left only by moving your eyes you’ll see what I’m talking about.)

During play, if you see the flagstick more to the left of where it should be, you are aimed too far to the right.  Or if you see the flagstick more to the right it means you are aimed too far to the left.

To make this check on your aim work, you must be sure to turn your head the same amount every time so the target will show up in the same place when correctly aimed at.

I watch the people I play golf with set up.  Every so often, one of them hits a beautiful shot that goes ten yards to the right of the green.

“How did that happen,” they ask in vain. “It happened because that’s where you were aimed,” I say to myself.

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