Golf is Personal

Whenever you read a golf instruction book, or watch a video on YouTube, that instruction is fixed. Everyone reads, sees, and hears the same thing. But what each person needs to do to make that instruction work will be different. That’s because golf is personal.

By “personal”, I mean everyone is different in their size, strength, flexibility, conformation, and conception of athletic movement. This means everyone has to do something a little bit different to install the same bit of instruction into their swing.

I can only use myself for an example to explain what I mean.

When you take the club away, the face should rotate open to stay square to the swing path. When I bring the club back, my natural preference is for my right forearm to stay oriented toward the ball somewhat, and not rotate clockwise. I don’t try to do that, it’s just me.

The effect of this is for the clubface to close. So, I hit a lot of hooks unless…

…I begin my swing with a gentle push by the left hand. Now my left arm dominates, the right arm turns like it supposed to, and the clubface stays square.

Or when I pitch. This one absolutely drives me nuts. From out of nowhere, SHANK! It’s just a short stroke. How can you hit a hosel rocket? Well, getting back to the right hand.

If I try to control the shot with my right hand, I discovered the club pops outside a bit on takeaway. Now the swing plane is forward of its position at address. The shank is baked in and there’s nothing I can do about it.

So again, I begin the takeaway with a gentle push by the left hand, which keeps the club on plane.

Two problems, same solution, because of the same tendency.

Here’s a different one. I will see the hole to the left of where is really is when I stand up to a short putt. Needless to say, I miss to the left more than to the right.

I pointed this out during a playing lesson, and the pro noticed right away that I wasn’t standing square to the line of the putt. My feet were in place, but my hips were turned a tiny bit to the right. This had me looking around a corner to find the hole.

I don’t align my hips deliberately that way, that’s just what happens when I take my stance. So when I get into my putting stance now I always kink my hips the slightest bit counter-clockwise to get square.

These are three examples, and I could give you more if I thought about it, but you get the point.

I’m doing everything right, but by just being me I introduce tiny errors that put me off by just enough to make the difference between a good shot and a not so good one.

It will do you some good to investigate the mistakes you’re making to find out if they are errors in technique, or errors that have only your name on them.

If it’s truly the second, you can keep doing what you’re doing and build in another move to compensate, or, much easier, build in a prevention so you’re right from start to finish.

Really, I think you’re much closer to being a better golfer than you are now if you can only attend to these little details. When you figure how precise the impact geometry has to be to hit a good shot, it only takes a little detail to throw it all off. Correct the little details and you might start playing a different kind of golf.

Getting Ready For Spring

About a month ago, I posted some suggestions for your winter practice. I was following that plan at the time, but you know how my mind wanders, so I thought I would let you know what is going right now.

It’s hard to practice approach putting when it’s raining so much and the practice greens are soaked, so most of my putting practice goes on in my back room on a very short-pile carpet–perfect for the task.

I am firmly committed to the two-putter plan. That has me practicing up to ten-foot putts with my face-balanced putter, at least nightly, and whenever I’m home with nothing important to do (which is all the time when I’m home).

When I go to the the range, I bring my sand wedge and my pitching wedge. I pick out a target on the ground and try to drop a ball right on top of it. I don’t pitch to an area. I pitch to a spot. Most of the time it’s a ball lying out there somewhere.

I have been doing this for years at the range, and have developed a sense over that time of what a distance feels like and what I have to do to hit the ball there, just by looking at it. Sometimes I get the ball so close it’s scary.

Not bragging here. If you practice something often enough you get good at it.

As far as the swing goes, I am deep into a new (for me) mental approach to it.

I have written about Gabrielle Wulf’s work on the benefit of external focus (in golf, the club) rather than internal focus (the golfer) in learning, improving, and performing.

Now let’s combine that with the Ernest Jones method of “swing the clubhead.” To me, that is an early expression of external focus. By swinging the clubhead, the body will automatically do the right thing.

Well, it’s a bit more complicated than that, but it is on the right track.

I swing a Titleist 20.5° fairway wood (975J) in my back room. I take the club back slowly with a gentle push by the left hand. Slow is important because I want to feel the clubhead throughout the swing. If the start is too fast, that feel will not emerge.

The backswing is nothing more than feeling the clubhead move back and up. The forward swing is the same. I feel the clubhead move down, around, and through.

My mind is on nothing else than the clubhead moving. I mentally follow its movement back and forward again. I really have no concept of what my body is doing, because my mind is on something else, so getting stuck on technique is out the window.

I can’t think about hitting the ball, hitting it a long way, hoping I will hit a good shot, or any other irrelevant and destructive thought. It’s just, follow the clubhead.

The results I’m getting are very good. I’m hitting good shots easily.

If you want to try this, I suggest you begin with a sand wedge, because its weight makes the clubhead easy to feel throughout the swing. There is no need to bend way over when you swing it. Stand up in your driver stance and pretend your sand wedge is a short driver.

I have been through a lot with my health in the past six years. I am unable to play golf the way I used to, but that doesn’t mean I can no longer play good golf. It means I have to find a different way. I have growing confidence that this is the way.

My Golf Predictions for 2018

Here we are at the top of a new season. Those of you who live in sunny climates can start it right after you read this post, but the rest of us, who live in the other 80% of the country, will have to wait until about April to start playing the golf we know we are capable of.

It’s also a time for predictions for the new year. Here are mine. I guarantee they will come true.

1. Somewhere in Michigan a golfer trying to break 90 for the first time will finally leave his driver home, and shoot 88.

2. Golf writers will start worshiping Tiger as if they were 10 year-olds (actually, it’s already started, and in the golfing press it’s already all Tiger, all the time).

3. Jim Nantz will continue to be the sappiest announcer on the air. Johnny Miller will retire after the end of the year and by March 2019 everyone will miss him.

4. Golf courses across the country will start selling partial rounds, depending on the layout of the course, to serve people who do not have the time to play nine, let alone 18.

5. Gary Player will do 36,500 sit-ups.

6. One day you will play your usual game from tee to green, but putt the lights out, and beat your best-ever score by five strokes. From then on you will spend more time on the practice green than you ever have, and reap the rewards.

7. You will slow down your swing and learn to live with the extra distance you get.

8. Manufacturers will come out with new clubs that cost a LOT of money, and promise you the moon. You will decide to take half that amount of money, spend it on lessons and green fees instead, and become a better golfer with the clubs you already have.

9. The Recreational Golfer will continue to be the best unknown golf blog in America, but it’s OK if that one doesn’t come true (the unknown part).

Play well, and have fun in 2018.